Vitamin B Is One Of The Essential Fuels For A Healthy Body

You might have experienced sudden discomfort while carrying out your routine activities. Sometimes, you might ignore it but when you consult a doctor, he prescribes you Vitamin B and you feel energetic again. But have you ever wondered why? We will know about it in this blog later.

We all know about Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E but did you know there are actually eight types of B vitamins?
These 8 types of Vitamin B’s are

  • Vitamin B1 (or Thiamin)
  • Vitamin B2 (or Riboflavin)
  • Vitamin B3 (or Niacin)
  • Vitamin B5 (or Pantothenic acid)
  • Vitamin B6 (or Pyridoxine)
  • Vitamin B7 (or Biotin)
  • Vitamin B9 (or folate or folic acid)
  • Vitamin B12 (or cobalamin)

These Vitamin B’s are not only different in name but they also range differently in their functions. Later, we will be discussing the functions and more in detail.

The basic functions of these vitamins include releasing energy from carbohydrates and fats, breaking down amino acids, transporting oxygen and energy-containing nutrients around the body.

Vitamin B1

Vitamin B1 or thiamine helps cells convert carbohydrates into energy which is mainly supplied to the brain and nervous system. It plays a major role in muscle contraction and the conduction of nerve signals. This vitamin plays an important role in the metabolism of pyruvate which is an important molecule responsible for several chemical reactions in the body.

The most common food sources of thiamin are whole grain products such as bread, cereals, rice, pasta & flour, wheat germ, pork, eggs, legumes, peas, nuts, seeds, dairy products, fruits, and vegetables.

Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2 or riboflavin helps to break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in your diet and convert it to energy. This vitamin is necessary for healthy skin, gut, and blood cells. It helps to increase energy levels, boost the immune system, and treat acne, muscle cramps, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

The common food sources of riboflavin are fish, meat, turkey, chicken, kidneys, liver, eggs, dairy products, asparagus, artichokes, avocados, cayenne, currants, fortified cereals, lima beans, peas, molasses, mushrooms, nuts, parsley, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, broccoli, sprouts, spinach, yeast extract.

Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3 or niacin in your diet can help control high blood levels & cholesterol. Its deficiency can lead to pellagra which includes both physical and mental difficulties. It helps the body produce sex and stress-related hormones.

The common food sources of niacinamide are legumes, nuts, bread, dairy, fish, avocados, lean meats, liver, poultry, eggs, dairy products, seeds, legumes, and whole grains.

Vitamin B5

Vitamin B5 or pantothenic acid is responsible for many biochemical reactions inside the cells, which includes the breakdown of carbohydrates and lipids into energy. It helps the body to produce hormones, red blood cells and is responsible for growth.

The best sources of vitamin B5 are brewer's yeast, corn, cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, avocado, legumes, lentils, egg yolks, turkey, chicken, milk, split peas, peanuts, soybeans, sweet potatoes, sunflower seeds, whole-grain bread, cereals, wheat germ and salmon.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 or pyridoxine is a water-soluble vitamin found naturally in many foods and is vital for normal brain development, immunity and the functioning of the nervous system. A lack of Vitamin B6 can reduce the count of red blood cells that carries oxygen to tissues throughout the body.

The main sources of vitamin B6 are poultry, fish, potatoes, chickpeas and bananas.

Vitamin B7

Vitamin B7 or biotin is required to metabolize fats, carbohydrates and protein in the body. It helps in synthesizing amino acids, fatty acids, generating glucose and helps to improve nail, hair and skin health.

The rich source of biotin includes baker’s yeast, wheat bran, organ meats, cooked or whole eggs and oysters.

Vitamin B9

Vitamin B9 or folate is water-soluble and available naturally in many foods. Vitamin B9 or folic acid is necessary for producing red blood cells, enhancing brain activities, helping in rapid division and growth of cells, synthesis of RNA and DNA.

The food sources of vitamin B9 include spinach, artichoke, turnip greens, okra, broccoli, asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, beets, potato, lentils, peas, beans, avocado, papaya, kiwi, oranges, pasta, bread, peanuts, soy seeds, sunflower seeds, egg yolk, baker’s yeast, milk, salmon, and meat.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 or cobalamin helps in the formulation of red blood cells and DNA. It is also important for the functioning and development of brain and nerve cells. It plays a major role in the synthesis of fatty acids and energy production. It also helps in the multiplication of red blood cells.

The rich sources of Vitamin B12 include fish, meat, eggs, dairy products, lamb, some nutritional yeast products, eggs, soya milk and breakfast cereals.

By now, you are aware of the importance of Vitamin B’s in maintaining good health and well-being. In case of any deficiency, it will directly impact your energy levels, brain function, and cell metabolism.

If you are facing the following symptoms, then you may suspect that you are lacking sufficient Vitamin B in your diet:

  • Skin problems like rashes
  • Cracks around the mouth
  • Scaly skin on the lips
  • Swollen tongue
  • Fatigue, weakness
  • Anaemia
  • Irritability or depression
  • Nausea
  • Digestive issues like abdominal cramps, diarrhea and constipation
  • Numbness or tingling in the feet and hands

If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms or you are susceptible to the deficiency then book your appointment with Expert on Vigyanveda Nutrition Care

Leave a comment